that hyena talks a lot about cetaceans

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Oct 1

Eh, I pre-ordered the Keiko book (ebook is out the 20th.) Not because I like giving money to a precious specimen like Simmons, but because I want to see what assertions he makes, and be able to discuss/refute whatever’s in it.

It’s not much different than antis or neutrals going to Seaworld/etc. And it’s not like I’m looking forward to reading a book by such a complete tool. Bleah.

Oct 1
disabledequestrian:

passion4killerwhales:

derangedhyena-delphinidae:

Remember, you can only care about an animal if you and your child can gaze at its face for a few minutes. (Please buy a plush on the way out to remember your special bonding moment with.)If you support Seaworld, you don’t actually care about these animals. End of story. 

Now picture this but with 9 more orcas.

cetacean-captivity

“#im pro captivity btw#and they can tell you why#cause youre being over dramatic”I normally don’t look at tags, but since you broke the note-train with a summon of my favorite brick wall, I glanced.Can you tell me why you’re pro-cap?And while the pic’s obviously exaggerating, I don’t think any aspect of this is overdramatic.

disabledequestrian:

passion4killerwhales:

derangedhyena-delphinidae:

Remember, you can only care about an animal if you and your child can gaze at its face for a few minutes. (Please buy a plush on the way out to remember your special bonding moment with.)

If you support Seaworld, you don’t actually care about these animals. End of story. 

Now picture this but with 9 more orcas.

cetacean-captivity



I normally don’t look at tags, but since you broke the note-train with a summon of my favorite brick wall, I glanced.

Can you tell me why you’re pro-cap?

And while the pic’s obviously exaggerating, I don’t think any aspect of this is overdramatic.

Oct 1

Zoos VS Animal Circuses

wildwesjames:

  So I’ve had this idea for a while that perhaps in order for a wildlife institution to use the label of “ZOO” they would have to be an actual functioning zoological research or education center, having its main focus on the animals themselves. Many zoos and aquariums serve as specialized and vital centers for study and breeding operations and I believe that opening up these institutions to the public it extremely necessary to the education and awareness of the public however, ”for profit” entities should not be able to use that title instead be labeled as “animal circuses” for displaying animals only for the purpose of making money. Those places do not teach the love of the animals as wild creatures but of what tricks they can do to entertain us. (lookin at you Seaworld)

 There are a lot of people though who blindly label ALL zoos as being negative without understanding the difference between each individual facility. We need zoos, we need people to be able to have a place to both research, breed, and be close to wild animals. As the famous ocean biologist Sylvia Earle has said- “You can’t love what you do not know” and zoos give a place for the general public who may have never given a second thought to the decline of red pandas, or the overfishing of sharks to get right next to these animals and empathize, learn, and fall in love.  I can’t tell you how many wildlife biologists and naturalists I have met that got their start as a wide eyed child in a zoo.  What we do not need are places that exploit animals for material gain, because it’s those very same place that make people anti-zoo and make it harder for the real scientists do advocate for animals. We need a safe environment for those who didn’t love them before entering, to leave with a different perspective but it CANNOT come at the cost of the organism’s wellbeing.

 I strongly believe if we make stricter guidelines for what is allowed to be a “zoo” it will improve both the treatment of animals and the impact they have on the people who enter. 

Oct 1

I am drowning in reblogs again. I haven’t even posted any new art.

Hi new followers. I talk a lot on this blog. I also occasionally post art. 

Feel free to ask questions if you have any.

Oct 1

Mark Simmons.

>”Sadly, Keiko suffered a long, slow and physiologically punishing death at their hands.”

It’s funny how we can literally replace Keiko’s name with any dead captive and assume the “their” is Seaworld/any other park, and that sentence works just as well. If not better. 

Because I’m sure all of those necrotic organs, perforated ulcers, systemic infections, birth complications, brain damage and other various fatal maladies were beautiful, painless walks in the park.

Like some kid who’s not yet been told Santa’s fake, I’m not sure Simmons ever got the memo Shamu’s dead.

griseus:

AS PIGEONS, DOLPHINS CAN SENSE MAGNETICS FIELDS.

Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation and navigation in some animals species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans’ migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking.
A number of different animals are thought to possess this magnetic sense, called “magnetoreception,” including turtles, pigeons, rodents, insects, bats and even deer (which are related to dolphins)
In the new study,researchers tested the magnetic sense in captives bottlenose dolphins at the delphinarium of Planète Sauvage in France. Scientists presented the animals with barrels containing either a magnetized neodymium block or a demagnetized block of identical shape and density. Then the researchers video recorded the animals poking around the barrels. When the barrel contained the magnetized block, the dolphins swam toward it much faster than when it contained the demagnetized block,  suggesting that dolphins have magnetoreception.
in 2011 by examining the structures in a dead Guiana dolphin, and training a live one to respond to an electric field comparable to that generated by a fish, the team showed that dolphins also have electro-sensory perception. Indeed, the finding suggests nearly all mammals have at least the potential to evolve it too. 


Photo Common Dolphins (Delphinus capensis)  by Paul Cowell
Reference (Open Access) Kremers et al. 2014. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

griseus:

AS PIGEONS, DOLPHINS CAN SENSE MAGNETICS FIELDS.

Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation and navigation in some animals species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans’ migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking.

A number of different animals are thought to possess this magnetic sense, called “magnetoreception,” including turtlespigeons, rodents, insects, bats and even deer (which are related to dolphins)

In the new study,researchers tested the magnetic sense in captives bottlenose dolphins at the delphinarium of Planète Sauvage in France. Scientists presented the animals with barrels containing either a magnetized neodymium block or a demagnetized block of identical shape and density. Then the researchers video recorded the animals poking around the barrels. When the barrel contained the magnetized block, the dolphins swam toward it much faster than when it contained the demagnetized block,  suggesting that dolphins have magnetoreception.

in 2011 by examining the structures in a dead Guiana dolphin, and training a live one to respond to an electric field comparable to that generated by a fish, the team showed that dolphins also have electro-sensory perception. Indeed, the finding suggests nearly all mammals have at least the potential to evolve it too

Dolphins and whales experience pleasure


orcaobsessed:

Last week, Nalani turned 8 years old at SeaWorld Orlando. She was born to Katina and Taku on September 18, 2006. However, her story is quite abnormal… Nalani is SeaWorld’s first inbred killer whale; Katina and Taku mated, even though they were mother and son.
9 days after little Nalani was born, her 4-year-old brother/uncle, Ikaika, tried to mate with her. Her father/brother, Taku, was also aggressive with her. For some reason, Katina did not try to prevent these things from happening, as she seemed to favor her sons over her new daughter. In an attempt to resolve this issue, SeaWorld put nursing Katina, Ikaika, and Taku on benzodiazepines (drugs). Then Taku was shipped from Orlando to SeaWorld San Antonio and Ikaika (aged 4) was banished to Marineland Canada on a breeding loan.
The following year, Taku died prematurely at age 14 from West Nile Virus, which he contracted from a mosquito bite due to logging at the surface—something that would never occur naturally in the wild. After a legal battle between SeaWorld and Marineland, Ikaika was exported back to the U.S. in 2011, but instead of being reunited with his mom and siblings in Orlando, he was sent to San Diego, where he is currently held.
Katina and her 3-year-old son, Makaio, have recently been recorded mating. Additionally, little Makaio and his now 8-year-old inbred sister, Nalani, have also been witnessed mating. What will the future hold for this family? • Photo & Post: @seaslaverysucks

orcaobsessed:

Last week, Nalani turned 8 years old at SeaWorld Orlando. She was born to Katina and Taku on September 18, 2006. However, her story is quite abnormal… Nalani is SeaWorld’s first inbred killer whale; Katina and Taku mated, even though they were mother and son.

9 days after little Nalani was born, her 4-year-old brother/uncle, Ikaika, tried to mate with her. Her father/brother, Taku, was also aggressive with her. For some reason, Katina did not try to prevent these things from happening, as she seemed to favor her sons over her new daughter. In an attempt to resolve this issue, SeaWorld put nursing Katina, Ikaika, and Taku on benzodiazepines (drugs). Then Taku was shipped from Orlando to SeaWorld San Antonio and Ikaika (aged 4) was banished to Marineland Canada on a breeding loan.

The following year, Taku died prematurely at age 14 from West Nile Virus, which he contracted from a mosquito bite due to logging at the surface—something that would never occur naturally in the wild. After a legal battle between SeaWorld and Marineland, Ikaika was exported back to the U.S. in 2011, but instead of being reunited with his mom and siblings in Orlando, he was sent to San Diego, where he is currently held.

Katina and her 3-year-old son, Makaio, have recently been recorded mating. Additionally, little Makaio and his now 8-year-old inbred sister, Nalani, have also been witnessed mating. What will the future hold for this family?

Photo & Post: @seaslaverysucks

fightingforwhales:

seaworld did not invent orcas. good luck finding someone who doesn’t know orcas exist and then suddenly discovers them when they visit seaworld for the first time
if all they only use those whales as selfie props, i can almost guarantee you they learned 0 things about orcas at their time at seaworld because 1. seaworld is not an educational place when it comes to orcas anyway, and 2. they probably didn’t care enough to listen

Also, knowing they exist doesn’t help anything or anyone. Seaworld’s argument is one of interaction -> inspiration -> care -> conservation. How often is that process truly engaged?Rather than asking how many people had their gizzards tickled by seeing an orca flop around in a pool, a survey should (after a time) ask a) what park visitors remember about their visit and b) if any of their habits or efforts in life positively changed re: lifestyle, consumption, conservation, as a result. Because it’s not just about knowing and caring about a single animal.I suspect those numbers would be pretty dismal.

fightingforwhales:

seaworld did not invent orcas. good luck finding someone who doesn’t know orcas exist and then suddenly discovers them when they visit seaworld for the first time

if all they only use those whales as selfie props, i can almost guarantee you they learned 0 things about orcas at their time at seaworld because 1. seaworld is not an educational place when it comes to orcas anyway, and 2. they probably didn’t care enough to listen

Also, knowing they exist doesn’t help anything or anyone. Seaworld’s argument is one of interaction -> inspiration -> care -> conservation. How often is that process truly engaged?

Rather than asking how many people had their gizzards tickled by seeing an orca flop around in a pool, a survey should (after a time) ask a) what park visitors remember about their visit and b) if any of their habits or efforts in life positively changed re: lifestyle, consumption, conservation, as a result. Because it’s not just about knowing and caring about a single animal.

I suspect those numbers would be pretty dismal.

coffeeandkudzu:

caong:

fightingforwhales:

and…what exactly is SeaWorld’s thought process here?

Yesterday, they stuck Orkid, Makani, and a heavily pregnant Kalia in the medical pool and lifted them completely out of the water. Orkid is thrashing around, and the male trainer is trying to forcefully rip that thing (whatever it is, not 100% sure) out of Kalia’s mouth.

Why would they make Kalia lay out of the water like that when she’s getting close to the end of her pregnancy? Regardless of how long she was physically out of the water, it is not a wise move to do that to a whale who is so young and so pregnant.

Look at the size difference between an adult female like Orkid and Kalia though. I still don’t understand when Seaworld irresponsibly bred Kalia when they have an adult female who is completely unrelated to any of their animals and who has experience raising calves in Shouka.

At the end of the video you can see all three of them are quite desperate to get back to water they can actually physically move in. Why was this necessary? Orkid spent most of the time thrashing around, Makani was apparently separated from Kasatka just so they could hoist him out of the water, and Kalia is heavily pregnant. Which of Seaworld’s ‘world class’ animal care team decided this was a good idea?

I cannot believe how extraordinarily painful that must have been. Screw “uncomfortable” — there’s a reason whales DIE when they strand. Their organs *need* the buoyancy of the water.

A lot of the comments on youtube are noting that Orkid’s just moving to receive fish. But the biggest and most agitated-seeming motion happened after being given fish (the whole-body flop.) I’m not sure how to interpret that but it certainly doesn’t look comfortable.

And I’m still trying to understand what the point is of taking the thing away from Kalia is. Either they needed to take it away … in which case, they failed utterly, or they just wanted to take it away. As an exercise in obedience? To assert that they could? WTF is the point of that? You’re obviously not going to be able to take something from an animal of that size easily if it doesn’t want to give it to you. (Didn’t it arguably set a worse example by showing her she could have her way by persisting?)